Anxiety

Anxiety. It is one of the behaviors seen in persons with addiction that is disproportionate to the rest of the population. Anxiety’s self-treatment with drugs and alcohol gives an individual a temporary sense of relief (‘numbing their fears’); however, there is long term damage done to the mechanisms that help relieve the symptoms of anxiety. This cycle of self-medication digs a deeper and deeper hole for the addicted person making treatment and breaking this downward spiral harder and harder as time goes by. Unfortunately, because alcohol and drugs can trigger panic attacks, this attempt at self-medication often makes the disorder even worse.


The Landon Institute’s missive is to identify the root of the patient’s mental illness in order to commence the process of healing. In this case, the symptoms of anxiety begin before alcoholism develops, confirming that substance abuse is often used as a way to self-medicate for anxiety.

Written by Dr. Niccole

Posted on August 29, 2016

But anxiety disorders involve more than temporary worry or fear. For a person with an anxiety disorder, the anxiety does not go away and can get worse over time. The feelings can interfere with daily activities such as job performance, school work, and relationships. There are several different types of anxiety disorders. Examples include generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder. People with generalized anxiety disorder display excessive anxiety or worry for months and face several anxiety-related symptoms. People with panic disorder have recurrent unexpected panic attacks, which are sudden periods of intense fear. Panic disorder puts the individual on shaky emotional ground, dreading the onset of an attack at any moment. In fact, the fear of having a panic attack is just as debilitating for these patients as the attacks themselves.

Anxiety disorders involve more than temporary worry or fear. For a person with an anxiety disorder, the anxiety does not go away and can get worse over time.

They often avoid public situations and have difficulty maintaining relationships or holding jobs because of their overwhelming fears. Alcohol or drugs may temporarily relieve the distress of panic disorder, but ultimately these substances only intensify the symptoms of anxiety. In spite of the harmful consequences of drug and alcohol abuse, many people with a Dual Diagnosis believe that drinking or using drugs are effective ways to curb their symptoms.


Fortunately, as a Dual Diagnosis facility, The Landon Institute’s state of the art treatment center and our Board Certified Psychiatrists qualify them to evaluate, diagnose, and treat patients as they work to overcome the challenges of co-occurring disorders. Our patients will experience the benefits of recovery in a comfortable, secure environment, surrounded by a compassionate, caring team and an esteemed array of physicians from multiple disciplines to help quell and quiet the anxious mind...all in one convenient setting.


People with social anxiety disorder (sometimes called “social phobia”) have a marked fear of social or performance situations in which they expect to feel embarrassed, judged, rejected, or fearful of offending others.

In conjunction with our extensive psychiatric counseling, the treating psychiatrist may elect to use medications as an initial treatment of an anxiety disorder, and are prescribed as needed on a case-by-case basis. The most common classes of medications used to combat anxiety disorders are antidepressants, anti-anxiety drugs, and beta-blockers (visit Mental Health Medications). Antidepressants are an effective way for many Dual Diagnosis patients to achieve stability in their brain chemistry and to manage their responses to anxiety. Specifically, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) have been used with good results to help patients with panic disorder improve social functioning and lead satisfying, productive lives.


Be aware that some medications are effective only if they are taken regularly and that symptoms may recur if the medication is stopped. Antidepressants are used to treat depression, but they also are helpful for treating anxiety disorders. They take several weeks to start working and may cause side effects such as headache, nausea, or difficulty sleeping. The side effects are usually not a problem for most people, especially if the dose starts off low and is increased slowly over time. Your doctor may try several medicines before finding the right one.


Our esteemed team of Board Certified physicians and specialized clinicians will insure that your safety, comfort, and care are their top priority as they ease the patient down the peaceful path of recovery.

People with social anxiety disorder (sometimes called “social phobia”) have a marked fear of social or performance situations in which they expect to feel embarrassed, judged, rejected, or fearful of offending others.

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At our beautiful institute in Newport Beach, California, The Landon Institute provides nationally recognized evidence-based outpatient treatment programs for addiction, rehabilitation, and recovery. Our Board Certified Physicians are extensively experienced in addiction recovery and rehabilitation. We believe in a comprehensive, whole-recovery approach to overcoming chemical and/or alcohol dependency that focuses on all three factors of health that addiction affects: physical, mental and emotional health.

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